It was good to be back…

Our third week started with the next aerial count; this one was setting out from Cape May at 08:00 hrs. We were all on site on time and got some counts done before the plane came over at the expected time. Strangely, the plane didn’t do the second pass over Mispillion, which is the usual protocol. There were good numbers of Knot on Back Beach, so the Mispillion count team stayed out to resight there, as did the Brock team, while Cathy and Lys went out to trap the PIPLs at Fowler’s. With relatively good resighting in Mispillion through the day there were three boat trips, with the last crew leaving when it started to get dark – the rest of us ate our frittata before they got back!

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Delaware news – the final instalment

So the season is coming to an end, but we had plans to catch Knot on Back Beach to check if they had reached departure weights. We got the net set quickly near the camera and were able to view it from a boat to check safety and further up the beach to check numbers. We counted the Knot in and when we had a sample (50 birds), made a dry catch with samples of Knot (47), Turnstone (93) and Semis (43). As we thought, the birds were heavy (the Sanderling are almost spherical and waddling now), with some Knot well over 200 g, so we extracted and processed quickly before spending the evening watching migration from the Dupont Nature Center (DNC) – it’s certainly underway.

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Delaware news – part 4

Election day at home led to discussion in the Shorebird House as proxies had to be instructed. Then out to do resighting and surveys as we are in a new survey period, before showers and clean clothes to head up north (with a side trip to Bombay Hook in a thunderstorm for some) for our, now traditional, BBQ with Dave and Marg – a great time as usual, with food, drink, discussion and fireflies.

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Delaware news – part 3

So we still don’t have any Knot on this side of the Bay, but numbers are increasing in New Jersey. It seems that we maybe lost a lot of the Horseshoe Crab eggs with the nor’easter at the beginning of the season and the spawning hasn’t been good enough to fully replenish yet. The temperature is generally at a level that we can cope with, so not the normal highs over here. However, there clearly have been some Knot visiting us as we have recorded over 450 different individual Knot and seen some that have been marked in New Jersey this year.

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